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EVERYDAY LIVING, WELLNESS

TRUE OR FALSE…PROBIOTICS HELP YOUR GUT?

LUNCH ON THE CANALS IN VENICE, ITALY

LOTS and lots of ads out there for Probiotics these days. It seems they can fix anything from an upset tummy to brain fog……but, can they???

I consulted with the Harvard School of Medicine to get some REAL information as to what this magical compound can really do for us:

What are the benefits of taking probiotics? Bacteria have a reputation for causing disease, so the idea of tossing down a few billion a day for your health might seem — literally and figuratively — hard to swallow. But a growing body of scientific evidence suggests that you can treat and even prevent some illnesses with foods and supplements containing certain kinds of live bacteria. Northern Europeans consume a lot of these beneficial microorganisms, called probiotics (from pro and biota, meaning “for life”), because of their tradition of eating foods fermented with bacteria, such as yogurt. Probiotic-laced beverages are also big business in Japan.

Some digestive disease specialists are recommending probiotic supplements for disorders that frustrate conventional medicine, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Since the mid-1990s, clinical studies suggest that probiotic therapy can help treat several gastrointestinal ills, delay the development of allergies in children, and treat and prevent vaginal and urinary infections in women.

BENEFITS OF TAKING PROBIOTICS:

Not all probiotics are the same. Different strains of the bacteria have different effects. For example, one strain may fight against cavity-causing organisms in our mouths and don’t need to survive a trip through our guts.

Research has been promising for these friendly critters. Potential benefits of probiotics have been seen in the treatment or prevention of

  • diarrhea
  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • ulcerative colitis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • H. pylori (the cause of ulcers)
  • vaginal infections
  • urinary tract infections
  • recurrence of bladder cancer
  • infection of the digestive tract caused by Clostridium difficile
  • pouchitis (a possible side effect of surgery that removes the colon)
  • eczema in children.

Probiotics are generally considered safe — they’re already present in a normal digestive system — although there’s a theoretical risk for people with impaired immune function. Be sure the ingredients are clearly marked on the label and familiar to you or your health provider. There’s no way to judge the safety of unidentified mixtures.

PROBIOTIC SUPPLEMENTS:

In the United States, most probiotics are sold as dietary supplements, which do not undergo the testing and approval process that drugs do. Manufacturers are responsible for making sure they’re safe before they’re marketed and that any claims made on the label are true. But there’s no guarantee that the types of bacteria listed on a label are effective for the condition you’re taking them for. Health benefits are strain-specific, and not all strains are necessarily useful, so you may want to consult a practitioner familiar with probiotics to discuss your options. As always, let your primary care provider know what you’re doing.

I hope this research helps you with YOUR health journey. As usual, take time to do your own research and chat with your care professional prior to embarking on any new program or diet.

Stay healthy and eat well. See you on the other side:)

Ricollette @Christmas Market

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